All’s Well Review

Miranda Fitch’s life is a waking nightmare. The accident that ended her burgeoning acting career left her with excruciating, chronic back pain, a failed marriage, and a deepening dependence on painkillers. And now she’s on the verge of losing her job as a college theatre director. Determined to put on Shakespeare’s All’s Well That Ends Well, the play that promised, and cost, her everything, she faces a mutinous cast hellbent on staging Macbeth instead. Miranda sees her chance at redemption slip through her fingers.

Miranda as our main protagonist isn’t the most likeable of characters. She’s quite a miserable person and doesn’t really ensnare me as a reader. But rightly so because of the debilitating nature of her pain. I think the commentary surrounding the medical field not believing woman when they say they are in pain was a great inclusion in this book and was a great topic to explore.

The way Miranda devolves during the course of the plot left me quite confused. I didn’t know what she was talking about half the time and didn’t know what was real or if she was just imagining most of her interactions.

I really want to know Mark’s intentions when he was treating Miranda. Did he really just not believe in her pain or was he just being intentionally harmful to her. She expressed to him a few times in her sessions that he was hurting her and the stretches weren’t helping and he would still persist. I can understand her frustrations for sure and I was somewhat satisfied when she projected her pain onto him or whatever it was that she did.

I think what I didn’t really enjoy about the book was that there was no explanation. How the three men gave her the powers and healed her of her pain and how she was able to transfer it to the others. Did she suck out their energy and vitality and used that to heal herself or did she just give them her pain. At the end of my read I’m still left with questions and I’m just not feeling satisfied.

⭐️2/5 stars Regrettably forgettable!

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